Sheena Faherty

Sheena Faherty

Graduate Student, Biology, Duke
Sheena Faherty

Sheena is a doctoral candidate in the Biology Department at Duke University. She is intrigued by weird animal behavior, specifically physiological extremes such as hibernation. Her dissertation work focuses on the genetic controls of lipid metabolism during hibernation when fat-storing mammals switch to lipids as their sole fuel source for up to 8 months. She investigates this phenomenon in the only primates capable of hibernation behavior, the dwarf lemurs of Madagascar, using a combination of field and captive studies, molecular biology, and sheer, dumb luck. Her research has plopped her deep into the exotic rainforests of Madagascar where she spend months at a time chasing elusive lemurs through the trees and scouting for hibernating animals, as well as working with the captive colony of dwarf lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center. When not tripping over her own feet in Madagascar, she enjoys rock climbing, cycling, volleyballing, and dancing awkwardly when no one is watching. She has been a guest blogger for the Duke Research blog, the Duke Medicine blog, and Scientific American, along with maintaining her own blog about her work in Madagascar.

ComSciCon-CanAtlantic 2021

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