Publications

2015
Hemmelder V. Hello, is it me you're looking for? Sara Seager's quest for living worlds in space. CASW New Horizons in Science [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Unlike the early explorers who sailed vast oceans to reach faraway shores, planetary scientist Sara Seager will never set foot on new lands she may discover. Her goal is to find habitable exoplanets, worlds that are not merely outside our solar system but many light-years away.

Kamath A. Homelessness and aging: where 50 is the new 75. CASW New Horizons in Science [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Many Americans live one paycheck away from street homelessness, and those most at risk may be older, according to new research presented at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Oct. 11 by Margot Kushel, professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

Ellis K. The last first exploration of the solar system: into the Kuiper Belt. CASW New Horizons in Science [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

How do you make the outer space equivalent of a golf putt from New York City to a soup can in Los Angeles? For Alan Stern, it takes 11 years of lobbying, four years of planning and building, nine-plus years in transit, and roughly $700 million.

Zare A. Light-driven controls could illuminate the circuitry of the brain. CASW New Horizons in Science [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

"Brain control" brings to mind an image of evil scientists hidden away in a dark lab preparing an army of zombies to do their bidding. In reality, Edward Boyden, associate professor of biological engineering and brain and cognitive sciences and head of the Synthetic Neurobiology Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, hopes that controlling a mouse brain can reveal its biological circuitry.

Best C. Mapping the Earth’s microbiomes: federal agencies join forces to explore the microbial world. CASW New Horizons in Science [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Microbes are organisms that are invisible to the naked eye. They surround us but usually go unnoticed. Now the federal government has a new focus on microbes, said Jo Handelsman, associate director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, speaking Oct. 11 during CASW's New Horizons in Science program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. More than 10 federal agencies and departments recently joined forces to share data and draft a coordinated plan to map the Earth’s microbiomes, the collections of microbes that live in particular habitats such as in the ocean or on your skin.

Bessen J. The mighty microbes: White House initiative recognizes the huge impact of tiny bugs. CASW New Horizons in Science [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The federal government has assembled a fast-track committee to encourage research into microorganisms, reflecting their increasingly important role in human health and the Earth’s climate.

Tomes A. Need to survive in a tough environment? There's an app for that. CASW New Horizons in Science [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

For Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Penny Chisholm, the most exciting apps will not download to your phone. Only bacteria can run them.

Litwhiler M. Solving a biological puzzle: why some genes never change. CASW New Horizons in Science [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

A mysterious discovery has stumped scientists who study genetics at the cellular level for over a decade. Our genome, or collection of genes, has undergone many evolutionary changes since humankind first emerged millions of years ago, including parts of it that play a critical role in development and survival. Yet hundreds of small segments of our DNA have remained virtually unchanged not only among human beings, but across many other animal species whose lineages diverged before the time of the dinosaurs.

Gilman C. Tiny is the new huge: microthrusters for miniature satellites. CASW New Horizons in Science [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The new big thing in space is small—cubesats. A miniature satellite or cubesat is a box a few inches on a side, around a liter in volume and weighing about as much as a medium-sized pumpkin. Cubesats have been on the space scene for about 15 years, with hundreds launched, but many still regard them as little more than toys.

Yengul S. To Pluto and beyond: a journey to the outer reaches of the solar system. CASW New Horizons in Science [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

On Jan. 19, 2006, a powerful Atlas V rocket thundered off from Florida carrying NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft. It got relatively little public attention. But its acceleration was singularly brutal: the destination of its payload was Pluto, over 3 billion miles away. The nuclear-powered New Horizons craft, carrying a mere 1,000 pounds of instruments, went on to set NASA interplanetary speed records the whole way.

Bezold C. With the population on the streets aging, homelessness mimics a chronic disease. CASW New Horizons in Science [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Homelessness is like other chronic medical problems: in need of a cure. That realization came to Margot Kushel as she was working as a resident physician at San Francisco General Hospital in the 1990s, and it has shaped her work ever since. More than a third of the patients in the inpatient wards were homeless, seeking medical care for issues that were often exacerbated by life on the streets. The patients rotating in and out of the hospital faced complex health problems. They had just one thing on their side: youth.

Urban D. Chew On This: A Story For Your Ears Only, Part 1. Blog of the National Center for Science Education [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's Version
Urban D. Chew On This: A Story For Your Ears Only, Part 2. Blog of the National Center for Science Education [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's Version
Bonga B. Listening to our universe with gravitational waves. Nature SciLogs [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's Version
Ziter C. Does Madison’s land-use past overshadow our present-day choices?. Yahara in situ, the blog of the Water Sustainability and Climate project at UW-Madison [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's Version
Newman M. Lung Reduction Surgery Conducted in India for the First Time on Scleroderma Patient. Scleroderma News Today [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's Version
Faherty S. Graduate Students Learn to Tell Science-y Stories at ComSciCon Events. Nature SciLogs [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's Version
Angus M. Seasonal Precipitation: Doubts about Droughts. Nature SciLogs [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's Version
Lebonville C. When Learning is Infectious – A Placebo Effect Beyond Belief. Nature SciLogs [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's Version
Hong L. The Long Road from Coley Toxins to Cancer Immunotherapies. Scientific American Guest Blog [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's Version

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